Tag Archives: food system

Foodumentaries

23 Mar
“Have you seen Back to the Future?”
“No.”
Star Wars?
*Shakes head side to side*
“SERIOUSLY? The GODFATHER?
“NO! I have, however, seen Homeward Bound 2:Lost in San Francisco? Does that count?”
(Listen, I went to the theater to see Happy Gilmore and the theater was full. Please don’t judge.)
This type of dialogue happens on a weekly basis with me. Listen, I’m not a big movie person. If the film has something to do with action, science fiction, or anything remotely suspenseful or far-fetched, I’m not going to watch it. If you try to make me watch it, I will fall asleep immediately in an act of protest!
I know, I know.  You’re probably wondering WHY anyone would have this attitude towards movies! The blasphemy!
I can explain. I am a realist. I also have a short attention span. Therefore, I need to watch something that is either going to be relative to my life (documentaries), or at least make me smile and laugh (comedies and rom-coms).
I am a complete sucker for documentaries. I must say that over the past few years, I have watched a large number of documentaries and they have, in fact, changed the way that I view food. In particular, I have watched a majority of the documentaries listed below:
I am aware that with most documentaries, they are only showing one side of the story. However, there are a lot of stories about food that need to be told. Watch and then you can form your own opinions.
What are some documentaries that you have enjoyed or have changed the way that you look at food?
Until we meet again,
Meg

Watch this video…

1 Mar

…and try to tell me that this 11-year-old boy does not have more insight about the food system in our country than a majority of adult Americans.

“Some people say that organic or local food is more expensive, but is it really?…It seems to me that we can either pay the farmer or we can pay the hospital.”

Not only is Birke Baehr smart, but he is a charming, confident,animated, and convincing public-speaker as well. The young man gives us a concise look at the abysmal state of our food system in the United States. He always tells us how to make better choices.